Biomedical Science Ambassador Award Winners

 

 

Dr. Michael Cusimano  2017
Dr. Cusimano obtained his PhD, MD and Neurosurgery specialty training from the University of Toronto and Cranial Base and Microvascular Surgery from University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. From there, he has become an international expert in the fields of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and neurosurgery and is now a full professor in surgery at University of Toronto, as well as Neurosurgeon in the University Health Network, to name a few. He previously served as Vice-President and before that, National Director of Research for ThinkFirst Canada, a national injury prevention foundation. He has developed collaborations with the Toronto Catholic District School Board and Toronto District School Board and presented injury prevention related presentations in their respective schools. In his clinical research, his collaborations have resulted in expansion of several TBI research programs. Dr. Cusimano’s work has been presented at conferences such as American Association of Neurological Surgeons, and the Brain Injury Association of Canada among others.  
 Dr. Noralou Roos  2016

Noralou P. Roos received her PhD from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Citations to Dr. Roos’ work place her among the top 100 Canadian scientists according to The Institute of Scientific Information. She was a member of the Prime Minister’s National Forum on Health, received the Order of Canada and was elected a member of the Academy of Sciences of the Royal Society of Canada.Dr. Roos was a co-Founder of the Manitoba Centre for Health Policy.  Noralou’s research has largely concentrated on the use of routinely collected administrative data, starting with that collected by the health system.Most recently she developed EvidenceNetwork.ca, a non-partisan project enabling academics to publish evidence based commentaries on controversial health policy issues in traditional and social media. She also is working to help physicians and others diagnose and treat poverty by connecting individuals with benefits they are eligible for.

 Dr. Rockman-Greenberg  2015

Distinguished Professor, Department of Pediatrics and Child Health & Department of Biochemistry and Medical Genetics, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada

Dr. Rockman-Greenberg obtained her medical degree from McGill University in 1974. She began her academic career as a pediatrician and geneticist at the University of Manitoba in 1979. She has focused her research on the identification of the cause of genetic disorders that are over-represented in some of Manitoba’s populations. Subsequently, in collaboration with the communities of interest, new diagnostic tests and unique newborn screening programmes were introduced. Dr. Rockman-Greenberg was Head of the Pediatrics and Child Health, University of Manitoba, Canada and Medical Director of the Child Health, WRHA from 2004 to 2014. She is currently a clinician scientist in the Children’s Hospital Research Institute of Manitoba and a geneticist in the Programme of Genetics and Metabolism, WRHA.

 

 Dr. Frank Plummer  2014
Dr. Frank Plummer from the Public Health Agency of Canada and the University of Manitoba, recipient of the Biomedical Science Ambassador Award. Dr. Plummer is recognized in Canada and abroad for his work in public health and science, including recognition from the Royal Society of Canada for his distinguished achievement in medical science (the McLaughlin Medal), his investiture in the Order of Manitoba, appointment as Officer to the Order of Canada and induction into the Royal Society of Canada.  
 Dr. Chris Brandl  2013
Dr. Chris Brandl, Professor, Department of Biochemistry, Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry at Western University, and 2013 PIRNA winner of the Biomedical Science Ambassador Award, emphasizes the importance of science outreach programs for youth:“Nowadays students are exposed to the possibilities of a number of different careers.  Few are as exciting or have the impact of research science, yet opportunities for young people to get involved are limited. Outreach programs provide these opportunities, and are thus a very important component towards ensuring the next generation of scientists.”